Roger's retirement and related

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meganfernandez United States of America
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#31

Post by meganfernandez »

Owendonovan wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 12:09 am
meganfernandez wrote: Sat Sep 17, 2022 11:32 am
ponchi101 wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 5:37 pm The tournament director will be fine. The tournament OWNER may be doing a value assessment, for when the offer comes in.
Prices for the Laver Cup seat are already at 54,000 POUNDS, for the premier seats. Basically the same effect that Serena had at the open.
That's obscene. I know that's probably resale, but this is what I mean about selling out and retiring at Laver Cup rather than Basel. His retirement has the stench of commercialism and vanity to me. Not love. Basel would have been about love, where it all started.

You can't say a critical word about Roger. It's not allowed. I was always a Roger fan, but the sainthood toward the end bugged me. I know some people called him arrogant and such, so there was a teeny bit of criticism. But he became untouchable, and he actually isn't perfect. I also don't think that reputation really reflects who he is. I think he truly is a normal guy in many ways, and normal guys have flaws. We couldn't even suggest they exist, much less get to know what they are.
Yes, those prices are obscene, for anything, let alone a tennis match. Can't it be fitting he bows out at his tournament? Does it have to be country centric?
I think of it as less country-centric as place-centric. Nothing replaces home. Basel is home. But Laver Cup make a lot more sense logistically (lot more media there, surrounded by his peers and best tennis friends), and obviously Roger preferred it. It's a long, fun goodbye party, and he can play doubles and be plenty visible on the sidelines. They will do a ceremony for him in Basel. Maybe he'll even play an exo some night there. With Mirka!
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#32

Post by ashkor87 »

Interesting comment by Federer in his pre-match interview..he said maybe people don't volley because it is too taxing to serve, take a few steps to the net and then have to go back because it was a fault..I have never heard that before!
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#33

Post by Deuce »

ashkor87 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 2:02 am Interesting comment by Federer in his pre-match interview..he said maybe people don't volley because it is too taxing to serve, take a few steps to the net and then have to go back because it was a fault..I have never heard that before!
In the late 1990s, I had the privilege of watching Pat Rafter play a match from a perfect vantage point (behind the court, off to the ad side, and a few rows up from court level). I still vividly remember my predominant thought throughout that match being that it was absolutely incredible how much energy Rafter needed to use to play his serve & volley style of tennis.
It's no wonder that he was always sweating buckets!

You serve and move in... ok so far... But then the return gets to you significantly faster than if you're merely hanging out 3 feet behind the baseline after your serve. So you've got to not only be ready to hit the return in mid air, but you also must adjust your feet and body to be able to hit a decent and effective volley - that means small adjustment steps as you're moving in and possibly moving to one side or another at the same time.
And you do this over and over. Even on faults, your instinct is to do it (unless the fault is a very obvious one). Over and over during each match, no matter how hot and/or humid it is... And over and over during practice, too. Day after day...
The word 'taxing' doesn't begin to describe it to me. 'Extremely exhausting' is closer... 'Potentially fatal' would be best.
R.I.P. Amal...
"A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world." ~ Oscar Wilde
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#34

Post by ashkor87 »

Deuce wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 3:00 am
ashkor87 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 2:02 am Interesting comment by Federer in his pre-match interview..he said maybe people don't volley because it is too taxing to serve, take a few steps to the net and then have to go back because it was a fault..I have never heard that before!
In the late 1990s, I had the privilege of watching Pat Rafter play a match from a perfect vantage point (behind the court, off to the ad side, and a few rows up from court level). I still vividly remember my predominant thought throughout that match being that it was absolutely incredible how much energy Rafter needed to use to play his serve & volley style of tennis.
It's no wonder that he was always sweating buckets!

You serve and move in... ok so far... But then the return gets to you significantly faster than if you're merely hanging out 3 feet behind the baseline after your serve. So you've got to not only be ready to hit the return in mid air, but you also must adjust your feet and body to be able to hit a decent and effective volley - that means small adjustment steps as you're moving in and possibly moving to one side or another at the same time.
And you do this over and over. Even on faults, your instinct is to do it (unless the fault is a very obvious one). Over and over during each match, no matter how hot and/or humid it is... And over and over during practice, too. Day after day...
The word 'taxing' doesn't begin to describe it to me. 'Extremely exhausting' is closer... 'Potentially fatal' would be best.
True but..what about hitting the ball 25 times at full strength for every point? That is taxing too...
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#35

Post by Deuce »

ashkor87 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 4:54 am
Deuce wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 3:00 am
ashkor87 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 2:02 am Interesting comment by Federer in his pre-match interview..he said maybe people don't volley because it is too taxing to serve, take a few steps to the net and then have to go back because it was a fault..I have never heard that before!
In the late 1990s, I had the privilege of watching Pat Rafter play a match from a perfect vantage point (behind the court, off to the ad side, and a few rows up from court level). I still vividly remember my predominant thought throughout that match being that it was absolutely incredible how much energy Rafter needed to use to play his serve & volley style of tennis.
It's no wonder that he was always sweating buckets!

You serve and move in... ok so far... But then the return gets to you significantly faster than if you're merely hanging out 3 feet behind the baseline after your serve. So you've got to not only be ready to hit the return in mid air, but you also must adjust your feet and body to be able to hit a decent and effective volley - that means small adjustment steps as you're moving in and possibly moving to one side or another at the same time.
And you do this over and over. Even on faults, your instinct is to do it (unless the fault is a very obvious one). Over and over during each match, no matter how hot and/or humid it is... And over and over during practice, too. Day after day...
The word 'taxing' doesn't begin to describe it to me. 'Extremely exhausting' is closer... 'Potentially fatal' would be best.
True but..what about hitting the ball 25 times at full strength for every point? That is taxing too...
Yeah - in a different way.
Serve & volley is like a sprint race (or LOTS of sprints), while baseline is more like a marathon...
With serve & volley, you have to make your decisions much more quickly. It's like rapid-fire - and that is more psychologically exhausting, I believe, than playing baseline, where you have more time, and where the game is more relaxed in comparison.
R.I.P. Amal...
"A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world." ~ Oscar Wilde
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#36

Post by ponchi101 »

Sampras said people no longer did it because it took too much. Martina has also said it is more demanding than playing from the baseline.
It was my style of play. That initial jump from the service line to the center T was the one thing I could do better than the other people at my level. But it was energy consuming. When I had to stop playing that style it was because I simply could not do it anymore. Yet, I am still able to roam the baseline.
But I disagree with that being the reason people stopped playing S&V tennis. It stopped because the new racquets allow the receiver to take all your power and send it back past you.
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Re: Roger's retirement and related

#37

Post by meganfernandez »

ashkor87 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 2:02 am Interesting comment by Federer in his pre-match interview..he said maybe people don't volley because it is too taxing to serve, take a few steps to the net and then have to go back because it was a fault..I have never heard that before!
Funny, McEnroe just said the same thing in an interview last week. Wastes energy and causes wear and tear. He also noted that back in the day, the surface quality wasn't as good, and there were more events on grass. The bounce wasn't consistently true, so it was smarter to volley. There are several factors at play in the death of S&V.
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